Two Roads to Emmaus: Luke 24:13-35

Narrator:  Now on that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, and talking with each other about all these things that had happened.  While they were talking and discussing, Jesus himself came near and went with them, but their eyes were kept from recognizing him.  And he said to them,

Jesus:  “What are you discussing with each other while you walk along?”

Narrator:  They looked at each other, and then at the stranger.  Then one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answered him,

Cleopas:  “Actually, it’s none of your business. 

Disciple:  Can’t you see we are overcome with sadness.  Please let us grieve in peace.

Narrator:  And the men hurried on. They said to each other,

Cleopas:  I just want to be left alone, one day’s peace, is that too much to ask?

Disciple:  I totally agree. Today I have no energy to talk to new people.  We have enough to think about without trying to explain it all to someone we don’t even know.

Narrator: And they kept discussing what had happened in Jerusalem. Jesus caught up to them again on the road.

Jesus:  What are you discussing with each other while you walk along?  Why are you so sad?

Cleopas:  It’s not something you could understand. 

Disciple:  You’re not one of us, you haven’t been through what we’ve been through. 

Narrator:  And the two men picked up their pace and left the man behind again. 

Disciple:  Who does that man think he is anyway?

Cleopas:   I don’t trust him.  There are robbers around here. Maybe he just wants to get close, and walk with us and then when we’re up there by those rocks ahead, his accomplice will jump out and they’ll both rob us.  It’s best to keep our distance.

Disciple:  I suppose, but maybe he’s just bored and needs someone to talk to.  i guess he can find someone else!

Narrator:  A while later, the man caught up to them again on the road. 

Cleopas:  Don’t even say it, you want to know what we’re talking about.

Disciple:  You wouldn’t understand.  We’re talking about Jesus, who was crucified three days ago.  It was the end of all our hopes and dreams.  

Jesus:  Maybe Jesus’ death was something that he knew about,  maybe it was all part of a plan.

Narrator:  And the man went on to describe why the Messiah had to suffer,  explaining it all with the help of scriptures.  They soon came to a village, and the man started to walk ahead.

Cleopas:  He’s going on. 

Disciple:  Should we invite him to have dinner with us here?  I’m not sure I understood everything he was saying.

Cleopas :  I’m pretty tired.  We’ve had a long walk. I don’t really feel like talking anymore.  Let`s just go in and relax.

Disciple: But Jesus would have wanted us to invite the stranger in for a meal.

Cleopas:  You’re right.  But Jesus died three days ago. We don’t know what happened to his body.  Could he be alive?  Is he dead?  Isn’t that enough to worry about for one day?

 Disciple:  I guess you’re right…

Cleopas: And besides, that stranger is quite far up along the road already.  We’d have to run and catch up to him.  I don’t feel like running.

Disciple:  I can still see him. Look, I think he’s looking over his shoulder at us.

Cleopas:  Probably just wants a free meal.  He can find some bread somewhere else.  Let’s go in.

Disciple:  All right, we’ve had a long walk.  Let’s call it a day.

******** 

Narrator:  Now on that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, and talking with each other about all these things that had happened. While they were talking and discussing, Jesus himself came near and went with them, but their eyes were kept from recognizing him.  And he said to them,

Jesus:  “What are you discussing with each other while you walk along?”

Narrator:  They stood still, looking sad. Then one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answered him,

Cleopas:  Are you the only stranger in Jerusalem who does now know the things that have taken place there in these days?

Jesus: What things?

Disciple:  The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people,  and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be condemned to death and crucified him. 

Cleopas:  But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things took place. 

Disciple:  Moreover, some women of our group astounded us. They were at the tomb early this morning, and when they did not find his body there, they came back and told us that they had indeed seen a vision of angels who said that he was alive. 

Cleopas:  Some of those who were with us went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said; but they did not see him.

Jesus:  Oh, how foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have declared! Was it not necessary that the Messiah should suffer these things and then enter into his glory? 

Narrator:  Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures. As they came near the village to which they were going he walked ahead as if he were going on. But they urged him strongly,

Cleopas: Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is now nearly over. 

Narrator: So he went into stay with them. When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them.  Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him;and he vanished from their sight.  They said to each other,

Disciple:  Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road while he was opening the scriptures to us? 

Narrator:  That same hour they got up and returned to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven and their companions gathered together. They were saying The Lord has risen indeed, and he has appeared to Simon!  Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he had been made known to them in the breaking of the bread.

 

 

About Carol Penner

I am a Mennonite pastor currently teaching theology at Conrad Grebel University College in Waterloo, Ontario. I’ve served congregations in Ontario and most recently, Alberta.

I love to write and to lead worship! If you are finding my writing helpful, I would love to hear from you! Feel free to use or adapt the material here, it is all written by me. If printing material, please credit “Copyright Carol Penner www.leadinginworship.com” (and say whether you modified it). If publishing, please contact me for permission. Contact me at carol@leadinginworship.com

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